The 13 Best Cookbooks of Fall 2019

The 13 Best Cookbooks of Fall 2019


In “Maangchi’s Big Book of Korean Cooking” (Rux Martin, $35), Emily Kim — the YouTube cooking star known as Maangchi, who wrote this book with Martha Rose Shulman — presents her recipes with encouragement that radiates off the page. Tofu stews are weeknight saviors; dosirak (lunch box meals) are perfect for children; and the section on Korean Buddhist temple cuisine, with recipes learned from nuns at a mountain temple, will delight vegans. Practical tips abound — cleaning shellfish, shelling chestnuts, reusing leftovers — and Maangchi even prepares you for grocery shopping in her upbeat, reassuring way: “The staff may not speak perfect English, but I guarantee they will be happy to see you and will assist you the best they can.” MARK JOSEPHSON

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CreditTony Cenicola/The New York Times

With the first line of her new book — “This is not a book about entertaining” — Alison Roman announces her break with model hostesses like Martha Stewart (whose first book was titled “Entertaining”) and others who keep things pretty and polite. Enemy of the mild, champion of the bold, Ms. Roman offers recipes in “Nothing Fancy” (Clarkson Potter, $32.50) that are crunchy, cheesy, tangy, citrusy, fishy, smoky and spicy, just like the ones she regularly contributes to The Times. They work, and not only for company: Labne with sizzled scallions, squash scattered with spiced pistachios or pasta with chorizo bread crumbs and broccoli rabe could appear anytime. For dinner parties, she provides cocktail recipes, extra snacks and pep talks so urgent and encouraging that having people over for leg of lamb and tiramisù suddenly seems like a bucket-list event. JULIA MOSKIN

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CreditTony Cenicola/The New York Times

Sababa, Hebrew slang for “it’s all good” or “everything is awesome,” is an apt title for Adeena Sussman’s new cookbook (Avery, $35). Ms. Sussman, an American food writer who moved from New York to Tel Aviv in 2015, adores the cuisine of her adopted city. All 125 of the vegetable-rich, herb-strewn recipes were inspired by her trips to the shuk (market), with its bins of olives, tubs of tahini and bunches of lemon verbena. An experienced cookbook author (including two books with the TV personality and model Chrissy Teigen), Ms. Sussman’s recipes are thoughtfully written and thoroughly tested. And dishes like roasted carrots glazed with tahini and date syrup, labneh with caramelized pineapple and sumac, and seared baby lamb chops marinated in shug (green chile, cardamom and cilantro sauce) capture the exuberant spirit of her new home. MELISSA CLARK

Recipe: Tahini-Glazed Carrots

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CreditTony Cenicola/The New York Times

The Southern chef Sean Brock is prone to diving deep into culinary rabbit holes, and thank God. His latest cookbook, “South” (Artisan, $40), written with Lucas Weir and Marion Sullivan, builds on the intellectual, culinary and historical work of his 2014 book, “Heritage,” but widens the lens from the Lowcountry to the Appalachian Mountains, where he grew up. Some of the recipes, like a pan-seared chicken breast with black pepper and peanut butter gravy, are a snap to make but deliver outsized results. Others, like tomato-okra stew and sour corn chowchow, sound simple enough but require making other recipes or investing weeks of time. Even banana pudding, with its roasted banana milk, pawpaws and homemade Cool Whip, is not safe in his hands. Still, I will keep this book forever in my collection because no one cooking today is doing more to help the Southern culinary flame burn brighter. KIM SEVERSON



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